Books to read if you liked ‘House of the Dragon’

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As for television adaptations, HBO game of thrones, at its peak, was the show that ended all shows. Hugely successful, high octane and exciting, it was no wonder he launched a global franchise. Now it’s time for Dragon Housethe hit prequel show game of thrones, take over in turn. While its first season ended on October 23, 2022, here are some books similar to Dragon House to help you out while waiting for the next season of the show.

FIRE AND BLOOD
(Bantam Books, 2018)

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George RR Martin

At the top of our list is Fire and Blood, the source material for Dragon House.

Set 300 years before the events of the A song of ice and fire (ASOIAF), the novel introduces readers to members of the Targaryen family when they are most powerful.

As the only surviving family from the fall of ancient Valyria and now the only dragon guardians, the Targaryens sit in the most coveted position in Westeros: on the Iron Throne. This book explores the events of the Civil War, the Dance of the Dragons, and what led to the downfall of the Targaryens. Since the book reads more like a historical narrative than a narrative narrative, the show has plenty of room to expand certain threads and improvise within the plot’s preset rhythms. A second volume of the book is reportedly in preparation.

A SONG OF ICE AND FIRE series
(Bantam Books and Voyager Books, 1996-present)

George RR Martin

This is the series that started it all and inspired game of thrones. ASOIAF chronicles the journeys of House Stark, House Baratheon, House Lannister, and House Targaryen as power shifts in Westeros.

A game of thrones (1996), the first book, introduces the fictional continents of Westeros and Essos, and also establishes many of the characters we’ll come to know and love over the course of the series. It features intertwined perspectives of nine characters, including Jon Snow, Daenerys Targaryen, and the Stark family: Ned, Catelyn, Sansa, Arya, and Bran. It’s been over a decade since the last book in Martin’s series, A Dance with Dragons, came out in 2011. It’s a long wait, but Martin is currently working on the next entry, The Winds of Winter. The end of the author of the books will be different from that of the adaptation.

CIRCE
(Petit, Brown and company, 2018)

Madeleine Miller

Circe takes place during the Greek Heroic Age. It is an adaptation of various Greek myths, including the Odyssey, told from the perspective of the witch Circe.

The novel explores Circe’s origin story and chronicles her encounters with mythological characters such as Hermes, the Minotaur, Jason, and Medea, and ultimately her romance with Odysseus and his son, Telemachus.

The way this novel handles femininity and the feminine rage that can come with it is brilliant. It’s decidedly feminist, but in a way that’s woven very organically into the story. Over time, Circe becomes more and more aware of how men are treated differently than women. She sees how daughters are punished for supposedly bad behavior, but sons never are. She sees how men become cruel when they discover that she is a woman alone on an island. She notices all these things, and her opinion on these inequalities is clear. An eight-episode television series based on the book is in the works at HBO Max.

THE PRIORY OF THE ORANGER
(Bloomsbury Publishing, 2019)

Samantha Shannon

This novel is epic high fantasy about a world on the brink of war with dragons – and the women who must lead the fight to save it.

The House of Berethnet ruled Inys for a thousand years. Still unmarried, Queen Sabran Ninth must conceive a daughter to protect her kingdom from destruction, but assassins are closing in on her doorstep.

As A song of ice and fire, The Orange Tree Priory is told from the perspective of many different characters in various parts of the world, with different loyalties, religions, ranks, and abilities. However, it is told from predominantly female perspectives, with only two male perspectives. From childbirth, to female empowerment, to sisterhood and friendship, to sibling love and appreciation, it focuses on women who support each other, no matter how different they may be. In a genre that often subjects women to sexism and violence, it’s refreshing to see.

Much of the novel takes place in the western kingdom called Inys, ruled by a long line of queens. If it wasn’t cool enough that the crown was passed down from mother to daughter, their lineage and the religion surrounding it is the key to keeping an ancient evil at bay – or so they believe.

HIBISCUS GIRL Duology
(Katherine Tegen Books and HarperCollins, 2017-2018)

Lana Popovic

This duology includes the books, Wicked like a wild fir treee (2017), and Ferocious as a firestorm (2018).

We discover that all of the females in the family of twins Iris and Malina have the unique magical ability or “glow” to manipulate beauty. Iris sees flowers as fractals and turns her kaleidoscope visions into glassware, while Malina interprets moods as music. But their mother has strict rules for keeping their gifts secret.

Iris and Malina are not allowed to share their magic with anyone, and above all, they are forbidden from falling in love. But when their mother is mysteriously attacked, the sisters must uncover the truth behind the quiet lives she has built for them.

In a manner similar to Dragon House, family dynamics are important in these novels. The girls’ relationship with their mother is strained to say the least. When they were children, they used to do magic with their mother, but at one point they were forbidden from accessing these powers, and their mother has been prickly ever since. Iris and her mother often fight, and the fights weigh heavily on both of them. All of the characters share a unique dynamic and having them work with each other in a mysterious plot provides plenty of intrigue.

Chababa Iqbal graduated in journalism from the Independent University of Bangladesh, who loves Jane Austen novels and Disney movies. Email: [email protected]

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